Safety First

Unless you are one of the very few people in the adult industry to be known by your real name, ensuring the safety of your identity is a crucial part of your life. Trusting relative strangers can result in horrendous consequences for not just yourself but also your family!

It has been announced recently that ‘Revenge Porn’ has risen considerably during the first part of this year, with the number of cases already higher than the whole of last year. One government funded helpline has seen an increase of more than 22% from last year and a recent report by Refuge has found that 1 in 7 women have received threats that intimate photos will be shared without their consent.

This year, no doubt due to the coronavirus and the consequent lockdowns has also seen a rise in domestic abuse and whilst it is not only women that are suffering, they are in the majority.

So how do you maintain your job in the adult world and ensure you stay safe now and in the future?

Starting off as you mean to go on is an absolutely crucial part of starting out in the adult industry. Always expecting the worst, utilizing every piece of security available and ensuring you always think first is the best advice you can receive and utilize.

For some though, it’s too late to act as the division between your public and private life has already become compromised. For those people, it seems that their whole world has crashed around them. This is especially pertinent for those working in the adult industry as it still causes upset to family and friends and the level of contempt is disturbingly high.

This can produce an enormous amount of distress to the person concerned and being ostracised for simply earning a living in the adult industry, can be the trigger for depression, melancholy and for some, alarmingly, suicidal thoughts ensue.

Not having any confidential routes to relay and discuss your concerns has been a huge issue for all adult workers, whether or not they work in sex or glamour. This is one of the main reasons that Leya Tanit set up Pineapple Support. Anyone in the adult industry can access their services for support, advice and counselling if required.

They have already provided help and support to lots of people and rely on donations to carry out this amazing work. If you have any interest in helping Pineapple Support, whether it’s with a much needed donation or if you are able to provide time, support or any kind of help, however small, don’t hesitate to get in touch.

https://pineapplesupport.org/

Carla Sez will back soon with more guidance on how to keep your work life safe and your private life secure and protected.

For now, think before you post!

Love All

Carla Sez x

Should you share your Life on Social Media?

Reaching out and providing support at anytime is important but even more so now.

Working from home has never felt so isolating and for most of us, admitting we are lonely and perhaps need help is one of the last things on our mind. For some unknown reason, that feeling of self-worth gets all screwed up in our head and finds its way out somewhat bitter and twisted. Sometimes we believe that everyone else should know how we are feeling, even though they don’t actually live inside our head!

Social media has a big part to play in todays world as we assume that once we have pressed ‘Enter’, all of our friends and all of the friends of those friends will see our post and come rushing to the rescue. The truth is that very few people actually see your latest ‘out-pouring’, and those that do find it hard to accept and respond to such an open form of counselling.

It is also increasingly difficult as you get older to accept help, we seem to revert back to those teenage years where we believed that nobody understood us and everyone was in fact out to make our lives difficult. Being independent is fine (up to a point) but at some time in our lives we all need a little bit of help, or a shoulder to cry on.

Knowing who you can trust and speak to about such personal matters is the first key to being able to cope with any kind of pressure. You shouldn’t wait until you need the help either. Find out who your real friends are by really thinking about your relationship with them.

You may share all the positive things in your life with a group of people or one person in particular and all the negative issues with another. You may even be the type of person who doesn’t ever share anything about their private life with friends ever.

Whichever group you belong to and especially if you are on your own, you do need support from time to time.

Pineapple Support have made it their mission to provide free support and therapy for all persons working in the online adult industry. It doesn’t matter about your gender, sexual orientation, ethnic origin, social status or age. They provide support 24/7 and their team of sex-worker friendly therapists offer face to face, or online therapy to anyone who needs it.

Their ever-growing team are always looking for ways to raise extra funds so that they can provide even more help for professional coaching, therapy and counselling for those who require help and support.

Do what you can to help this amazing cause.

Love to you ALL

Carla Sez x

Addiction & Recovery – Family

Tips and coping strategies from week 5 of the Addiction Recovery workshop with therapist Nicki Line.

Family

Here are a few concepts that may be relevant to some of your experiences.

 

Differentiation of Self v Fusion

Differentiation of self– The ability to be in emotional contact with others yet still remain independent in your thoughts, feelings, and emotional functioning. People who are well differentiated from others are able to face difficult, emotionally charged problems, and not feel compelled to preach about what others should think, feel, not rush in to smooth the problem over immediately, and not pretend to be attached emotionally.

Fusion– This is essentially the opposite of a well differentiated self.  People who lack differentiation typically set aside individual choices, thoughts and feelings in order to achieve or maintain harmony in the relationship system (this can be a family system, friend system, etc). Fusion occurs when people form intense relationships with others, and their actions depend largely on the condition of this relationship at any given time. When experiencing fusion, an individual’s decisions largely depend on what others will think and how others will react, and if the decision will upset the intense bond of the relationship. People who are not well differentiated may feel that everyone in a relationship system needs to think and feel the same way or else the bonds will be broken. So either they must mold themselves to fit others, or pressure others to think feel and act the same way they do.

 

Transgenerational Trauma

We briefly discussed how trauma can be passed down through our families. Here is a brief overview of transgenerational trauma in families if this feels relevant to you, or you’d like to look more into it.

Transgenerational trauma refers to trauma that passes through generations. The idea is that not only can someone experience trauma, they can then pass the symptoms and behaviors of trauma survival to the next generation, who then might further pass these along the family line.

Transgenerational trauma can negatively impact families as a result of:

  1. Unresolved emotions and thoughts about a traumatic event
  2. Negative repeated patterns of behavior including beliefs about parenting
  3. Untreated or poorly treated substance abuse or severe mental illness
  4. Poor parent-child relationships and emotional attachment
  5. Complicated personality traits or personality disorders
  6. Content attitude with the ways things are within the family

 

Family Genograms

We discussed that not only trauma, but certain patterns of behavior and interaction can pass through families and influence families. One way to take a closer look at patterns in your own family is to construct a family genogram.  A family genogram is structurally similar to a family tree, but it includes information about relationships, interactions between family members, mental illness, substance usage, and more information.  We typically take a look at three generations using a genogram.

 

Here is a guide on family genograms:

https://www.therapistaid.com/therapy-guide/genograms

Addiction & Recovery – Daily Gratitude & Positivity

Tips and coping strategies from week 4 of the Addiction Recovery workshop with therapist Nicki Line.

Our brains are hardwired to find the negative in our lives. It is a survival mechanism to find the threats. But we can do a few small things daily to help rewire the brain to find more balance.  We can do this by taking note of some positive things in our daily lives and practicing gratitude daily.

Here are some prompt ideas for positivity and gratitude. We can practice by daily journaling, acknowledging these things with another person, or simply answering these prompts to ourselves!

What made you smile today?

What went well for you today?

What made you laugh today?

Did you accomplish something today?

Did something go better today than it did yesterday?

What are things you are grateful for?

Did you see someone else do something good for someone today?

What gave you hope today?

Did you have a moment of peace today?

What made you feel good about yourself?

Who is someone you are happy to have in your life?

What do you enjoy about your work?

What is something that makes your life easier?

What is a part of your daily routine that you enjoy?

 

Here’s a bit of information on the benefits of gratitude incase you’re interested:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/amymorin/2014/11/23/7-scientifically-proven-benefits-of-gratitude-that-will-motivate-you-to-give-thanks-year-round/#30cf8fb7183c

https://time.com/5026174/health-benefits-of-gratitude/

If you are interested in a daily guided journal for gratitude here are some options from amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Gratitude-Journal-gratitude-mindfulness-productivity/dp/108063133X/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?dchild=1&keywords=daily+gratitude+journal&qid=1586183145&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEzSzIxU0xQNkhCWFlJJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwMTQ2MDEwMzdNQ0YyVURZS05YTyZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwOTE0MzgwMUtQT0s0TU5aOFkyQiZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2F0ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=

https://www.amazon.com/Good-Days-Start-Gratitude-Cultivate/dp/1976436184/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?dchild=1&keywords=daily+gratitude+journal&qid=1586183159&sr=8-2-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUE3TFZWWVFQMTE3OFgmZW5jcnlwdGVkSWQ9QTA5MDg5MjgyRzRSVzhMMFNXWldaJmVuY3J5cHRlZEFkSWQ9QTAzOTM1NzUyMUk5QlpFVlM1VklIJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

 

ROLES IN THE ADDICT FAMILY

The addict

The Enabler- The enabler is the family member who steps in and protects the addict from the consequences of their behavior. The motivation for this may be to protect the addict, or to reduce anxiety, or avoid conflict within the family system.

The Hero- The hero is the family member who attempts to draw attention away from the addict by excelling and being exceptionally “good”. Through their own achievements, the hero tries to bring the family together and create a sense of normalcy. This role is usually taken on by the eldest child, as they seek to give hope to the rest of the family. Unfortunately, a driving need to “do everything right” tends to put an extreme amount of pressure on the hero, leaving them highly anxious and susceptible to stress-related illnesses later in life.

The Scapegoat- The scapegoat is just what you would expect: the one person who gets blamed for the whole family’s problems. This role tends to be taken on by the second oldest child; they offer the family a sense of purpose by providing someone else to blame. They voice the family’s collective anger, while shielding the addicted parent from a lot of blame and resentment.

The Mascot- The mascot tries to deflect the stress of the situation by supplying humor. This role is usually taken on by the youngest child. Providing comic relief is also the mascot’s defense against feeling pain and fear himself.

The lost child- The lost child role is usually taken on by the middle or youngest child. They’re shy, withdrawn, and sometimes thought of as “invisible” to the rest of the family. They don’t seek (or get) a lot of attention from other family member. Lost children generally may put off making decisions, have trouble with forming intimate relationships, and choose to spend time on solitary activities as a way to cope.

 

GROUNDING TECHNIQUES

Here are some ideas for grounding techniques:

  • Hold a piece of ice and focus on the sensations
  • Put a handful of salt in your mouth
  • Sour candy such as war heads, sour patch kids, etc.
  • Place your head in a bowl of cold water.
  • Rub some scented lotion on your hands, focusing on the way it feels and smells as you work it into your skin.
  • Use a water mister to spray your face and/or chest.
  • Pick a hand and tap each finger with your thumb, starting with your index finger and continuing down. Go back and forth until you feel grounded.
  • Keep a bead, pebble, stress ball, a small piece of cloth, or another object of your choice in your pocket and roll it around in your hand(s) when you need to get grounded. You can also use a bracelet or necklace.
  • Run your hand slowly and gently over the carpet or the fabric of a piece of furniture or clothing and notice how it feels when you rub it in one direction versus the other.
  • Put a piece of chocolate in your mouth. Experience the texture, flavor, and feel as it slowly melts.
  • Stretch your arms up over your head as high as you can, then out to your sides, finally pulling your elbows back as far as you can behind your back. Repeat. Think about your muscles flexing and feel their strength.
  • Hug your favorite stuffed animal, a comfy blanket, or a pillow.
  • Take off your shoes and push your toes into the floor or ground.
  • Bite into a lemon or take a sip of lemon juice.
  • Find something in the room that starts with A, then B, then C, and so on.
  • Count backward from 100.
  • Put on your favorite song and really concentrate on the words, the music, and the way it all makes you feel.
  • Write how you’re feeling in a journal that’s designated for grounding and use your favorite pen. Notice how the pen feels in your hand and the smoothness of how it writes on the paper.
  • Play a game on your phone or computer.
  • Breathe in through your nose slowly and deeply until your lungs are full. Slowly exhale through your mouth until your lungs are empty. Repeat, concentrating on the feeling of your lungs expanding and contracting.
  • Pull a mental picture into your mind of your favorite place and imagine you’re there. Think about what you’d be doing if you were really there.
  • Go outside and smell the air or the flowers, trees, or leaves.
  • Jump up and down.

Addiction & Recovery – Boundaries

Tips and coping strategies from week 3 of the Addiction Recovery workshop with therapist Nicki Line.

Boundaries can be identified in each of the following areas:

Physical : What are your boundaries around physical contact?

Psychological: What are your boundaries around topics of conversation, personal information being shared, subject matter and things of that nature?

Emotional: With whom do you want to share your feelings with? How much emotion are you willing to take on from other people?

Spiritual: What are your boundaries around religion or other forms of spirituality, or lack thereof?

General: Other boundaries not covered through these topics.

Hard v Soft boundaries.

Hard boundaries are those boundaries that you are unwilling to compromise.

Soft boundaries are boundaries that allow for more flexibility and can be adapted.

Window of Tolerance

We discussed the window of tolerance, and how as we work through the things that trigger either a hyper-aroused response, or a hypo-aroused response, this window of tolerance (comfort zone on the graphic below) grows larger and larger.

 

As our window of tolerance grows, we are better able to stay in a regulated level of arousal, and we can return to this level of arousal more quickly and easily.

Taking Care of Others

Everybody in our lives has problems and issues, but what is important to pay attention to is whether or not they are actively and genuinely working on them. It is okay to be supportive, but always stop to ask yourself “Am I Working harder for this person than they are working for themselves?” as well as “ I am working harder for this person than I am working for myself?”

Remember: put your air mask on before helping others with theirs.

Color wheel of awareness

White= chill not focused on anything, in a safe zone

Yellow= noticing things but not focused on danger

Orange= found a threat and I am aware of it. Ex- person over there has a hand in his pocket.

Red= Found a threat, hyper focused on it.

Black= tunnel vision. Cannot see anything else. Only tunneled in on the threat.

 

 

Living in level orange or higher constantly is not good for the adrenal system. I tis likely you are going to experience physiological symptoms such as fatigue, digestive issues, headaches etc.

 

 

Boundary House

Using this blank outline of a house can help you decipher the boundaries you wish to draw with the people in your life, by visualizing how close the relationships are/ you would like them to be. Place the people in your life in either the bedroom, kitchen, living room or porch.

A general guideline:

Porch: You know this person, and may be acquainted with them but you are not going to let them into your house.

Living room: This is where you have friends come over, and you may hang out in here, but this person is not going to feel free to go rummaging through your kitchen and making themselves a snack.

Kitchen: This person is going to feel comfortable enough in your home to come in, go to your kitchen, grab themselves a snack or a drink without you doing it for them.

Bedroom: This is the most intimate of spaces, reserved for the most intimate of your relationships.

 

Keeping A Healthy Diet While in Lockdown

As the lockdown continues, our anxiety levels are starting to rise, and it is all too easy to ease those feelings by snacking on comfort foods, but emotional eating can be detrimental to both your physical and mental health.

These uncertain times are scary and I am certainly not saying that now is a good time to focus on losing weight or completely changing the way you eat. It is a time to start looking at food as a source of energy and health.

Eating a healthy diet is a great way to boost your immune system and it could help to fight off infections. “The World Health Organization (WHO) is also urging people to maintain a healthy lifestyle while on lockdown, saying it could boost their chances of a fast recovery should they contract Covid-19.”

  • Try to keep your mind active and healthy snack available for when you do get the urge to start picking.
    I try to keep dried fruit and nuts in the cupboards. Apple slices with a spoon of peanut butter is also a great go to for when you fancy something sweet. Hard boiled eggs, roasted sweet potato chunks and humus with chopped raw veggies are easy to keep prepared in the refrigerator. Here is Snack Nation’s Guide to 121 healthy snacks: https://snacknation.com/blog/guide/healthy-snacks/
  • Try to plan your meals for a whole week, this way you won’t have to worry about losing inspiration and turning to that frozen pizza in the freezer drawer. Planning meals in advance also helps ensure that you use up all of the ingredients, preventing waste and saving money.
  • Think about creating big meals that you can freeze, this is a great way to save money and ensure you have a healthy, home-cooked meal available even when you are feeling less than inspired to cook. There are lots of great websites with ideas for freezer meals, here are a couple that I stumbled across:
    Money Saver, Best Ever Freezer Meals – https://happymoneysaver.com/freezer-meals/
    Bon Appetite, 37 Recipes That freeze Well – https://www.bonappetit.com/gallery/recipes-that-freeze-well
  • “Three nutrients that you should definitely include (because they help to support your immune system) are Vitamin A (found in sweet potato and spinach), vitamin C (found in berries, tomatoes and peppers) and zinc (found in meat, shellfish, dairy and bread),” Ludlam-Raine adds for The Independent.
  • Oily fish is also one of the few food sources of Vitamin D which is important for bone health and our immune system. If you are not able to go outside as often as you would like, it is important to include this in your diet.
  • It is important to try to keep a routine, eating at set times throughout the day and in a set place. Avoid eating in bed or where you work, keeping your spaces separate. This should help curb your snacking and help your body adapt to your new schedule.
  • Keep yourself hydrated!!! Drinking plenty of water has an effect on your brain function, your skin, your physical and mental well-being. We should be drinking 1.5-2ltrs of water a day. Try upping your water intake (if you are not already drinking enough water) and see the difference it makes to how well you function.
  • It is important to treat yourself, especially during Corona Lockdown. Not only will this boost your mood, but it will also save you from snacking on treats you have forbidden yourself.
  • Most importantly, be kind to yourself.

 

Resources

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/coronavirus-mental-health-self-isolate-how-to-manage-quarantine-a9404431.html

https://www.health24.com/Diet-and-nutrition/News/5-tips-for-eating-healthier-during-the-coronavirus-lockdown-20200327

https://www.health24.com/Medical/Infectious-diseases/Coronavirus/stress-eating-while-in-lockdown-here-are-tips-to-avoid-it-20200403

Learn Something New During Isolation

After 5 years of living in Spain, during lockdown I have decided it is about time I learned Spanish. So, Rosetta Stone has been downloaded and over the past 4.5 weeks I have managed to take three classes. Not impressive in the slightest, but I am not beating myself up about it. Why? Because 1) the intention is there and 2) WE’RE IN LOCKDOWN!

Our brains are not working as they should, some of us may be feeling more tired than usual, unable to focus or our memories aren’t working as well as they usually do. This is completely normal, during such a stressful time and we all need to show ourselves a little compassion.

With that said, it is important that we keep our minds active, and learning something new is a great way to do that. Get creative, maybe you’ve always wanted to learn to crochet or knit a scarf. Create a piece of art for an empty wall. Now could be the time to learn how to build your own website or brush up on your SEO and keywords. Why not learn how to code?

It always great to work on your communication skills, that could be through learning another language or reading about psychology.

Learn a dance routine, learn to meditate or learn breathing exercises to keep your mind away from the news and your body active.

Whatever you decide to learn, go easy on yourself and try not to get frustrated if you’re not picking things up as quickly as you would usually. These are unusual times.

The most important thing is that you are caring for yourself, your mind and your body.

 

If you feel you need emotional support or counselling to help you through these unprecedented times. Please, reach out. PineappleSupport.org

 

With love, Leya Tanit

Keeping Active During Isolation

As you would expect, the team here at Pineapple Support have been promoting ways to keep your mind healthy during Covid-19 isolation and lockdown. For example Maintaining a routine, keeping the mind active, continuing regular therapy.

Maintaining some normalcy is incredibly important in caring for your mental health. And good mental health promotes good physical health.

“The American Heart Association recommends adults engage in at least 150 minutes (two and a half hours) per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, or 75 minutes per week of vigorous aerobic activity. A combination of both would work too, preferably spread throughout the week.”

Being locked inside it is very easy not to move as much as we would ordinarily. That’s why every little bit of movement helps. Build physical activity into your daily routine and make it fun.

While you are watching TV, do some squats during the commercials. If you are cleaning the house, pop on some music and turn your cleaning into a dance routine. If you have stairs, go up and down three times every time you use them. Heel raises when you’re washing dishes. Side lunges when you are putting clothes in the machine. The NHS recommends some seated exercises.

Being active and keeping your body moving, doesn’t always mean raising your heart rate. It is just as important to stretch, relax and work on your breathing. There is a lot going on in the world right now, we all need to take some time to pause.

Pineapple Support has put together a collection of workouts and breathing exercises on our YouTube channel, but there are so many more available online for you to try.

 

 

If you feel you need emotional support or counselling to help you through these unprecedented times. Please, reach out. PineappleSupport.org

 

resources

https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/coronavirus/coronavirus-and-your-wellbeing/#collapse98faf

Keeping The Mind Active During Isolation

In order to keep our minds healthy during isolation, it is important to keep them active. This doesn’t necessarily mean learning something new or doing math puzzles, unless that is what interests you. The important thing is to positively entertain your brain.

For those under 40 and particularly those in the adult industry, mobile phones and other electronic devices have become a major part of day to day lives. Some of us spending upward of 10 hours a day looking at a phone or computer screen. With social distancing becoming the new norm (for now), we risk becoming more isolated and more connected to our electronic devices.

Although these devices are imperative for our businesses, it is not healthy to spend long periods of time sitting in front of a screen. Especially as the blue light from devices like smartphones can be disruptive to your sleep and overall well being.

Try to vary your activities, keep your brain occupied and challenged. Get creative, try your hand at gardening or cooking new recipes. Read books or listen to podcasts.

The WHO Mental Health Considerations states that “During times of stress, pay attention to your own needs and feelings. Engage in healthy activities that you enjoy and find relaxing. Exercise regularly, keep regular sleep routines and eat healthy food. Keep things in perspective. Public health agencies and experts in all countries are working on the outbreak to ensure the availability of the best care to those affected.”

Here are some of my top choices for keeping the mind active:

1) Read a book
There is nothing better than getting immersed in a good book and ordinarily, if you’re like me, this is something I don’t usually have time for.
https://www.goodreads.com/list – book recommendations
https://www.instagram.com/booksandburgs/ – honest book reviews
https://readingagency.org.uk/ – Resources on booked and shared reading

2) Try a new recipe
Whether you’re a whiz in the kitchen or you boil toast, trying new recipes is a great way to vary your meal plan and ensure a balanced, healthy diet.
https://myfridgefood.com/ – use what you have in your fridge
https://www.allrecipes.com/recipes/83/everyday-cooking/convenience-cooking/ – Quarantine cooking recipes
https://food52.com/blog/25135-easy-coronavirus-quarantine-recipes – 13 easy quarantine recipes
https://eu.usatoday.com/story/life/food-dining/2020/04/10/coronavirus-quarantine-cooking-easy-recipes-you-can-make-few-ingredients/5131173002/ – Recipes with 5 ingredients or less

3) Work those green fingers
There are many benefits to having plants in your home and garden and now is the perfect time to get planting. As my fingers are more black than green, I’ve taken to planting a variety of cactuses.
https://www.gardenersworld.com/ – Gardening advice and inspiration
If you don’t have any outside space, they also have a guide to house plants https://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/must-have-houseplants/

4) Learn something new
https://www.marchnetwork.org/creative-isolation?lightbox=dataItem-k87hyknv – a link to 10 free university art courses
https://www.marchnetwork.org/creative-isolation?lightbox=dataItem-k7vvf8eb – Online Dance tutorials
https://www.duolingo.com/ – Free online language courses

5) Watch a tv series, movie or documentary
https://www.bbc.co.uk/arts – New culture in quarantine programming
https://www.nytimes.com/article/coronavirus-quarantine-what-to-watch.html – What to watch, read and listen to during isolation

6) Take a virtual tour
Many museums and galleries are offering virtual tours during lockdown:
https://smartify.org/ – Smartify is a web and mobile-based platform for some of the world’s best art and cultural institutions.

https://www.royalalberthall.com/tickets/series/royal-albert-home – Royal Albert Home will see artists sharing their work from their homes to yours.
https://artsandculture.google.com/ – Virtual tours of museums, art galleries and heritage sites.

7) Make travel plans for the future
We won’t be in quarantine forever and looking to the future and making fun and exciting plans are a great way to remain positive.
https://www.earthtrekkers.com/best-travel-adventures/ – 50 travel adventures to have in your life time
https://www.boredpanda.com/amazing-places-to-see-before-you-die-2/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=organic – 40 Breath taking places to visit before you die

8) Connect with friends and loved ones
Maintaining a connection with loved ones is vitally important during lockdown and we are extremely fortunate to be living in a time when there are so many different way to do this.
Read our blog on Maintaining a Connection With The People You Love.

9) Get active
Keeping the body active is just as important as the mind. So whether you train hard or schedule regular yoga sessions, it’s important to keep the body moving.
Pineapple Support has a selection of workout videos to choose from on our YouTube channel or you surf the web for thousands of options.

10) Play a board game
I know, it’s old skool, but board games are so much fun and can keep you occupied for hours.
https://www.vox.com/culture/2020/3/17/21182427/board-games-2-players-best-quarantine

When it comes to keeping your mind active, the possibilities are almost endless.
Get involved and let us know via Twitter @PineappleYSW what you are doing to keep your mind active during isolation.

 

 

Resources

https://www.realclearpolicy.com/articles/2020/03/30/young_people_are_lonley_too_487793.amp.html?__twitter_impression=true&utm_campaign=April%202020%20Newsletter%20(JDkhGP)&utm_medium=email&utm_source=April%20Workshop&_ke=eyJrbF9lbWFpbCI6ICJ0aGVyYXB5QGRlbmlzZS13b2xmLmNvbSIsICJrbF9jb21wYW55X2lkIjogIk41dWJEUyJ9&fbclid=IwAR0SV8WsNK-qJrqtBvYVXlJbFmX_NUj6KSGu0UoyozsU7kT0ilrPwJ0ZoBo

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/coronavirus-mental-health-self-isolate-how-to-manage-quarantine-a9404431.html

https://www.newyorker.com/news/our-columnists/how-loneliness-from-coronavirus-isolation-takes-its-own-toll?utm_campaign=April%202020%20Newsletter%20(JDkhGP)&utm_brand=tny&utm_term=TNY_Daily&utm_source=April%20Workshop&cndid=28664424&source=EDT_NYR_EDIT_NEWSLETTER_0_imagenewsletter_Daily_ZZ&mbid=&utm_medium=email&esrc=&bxid=5be9f97024c17c6adf0e91ae&utm_mailing=TNY_Daily_032320&_ke=eyJrbF9lbWFpbCI6ICJ0aGVyYXB5QGRlbmlzZS13b2xmLmNvbSIsICJrbF9jb21wYW55X2lkIjogIk41dWJEUyJ9&fbclid=IwAR1i8Z0lDRMjs-z8zHBWj3QbOzq6WIoVrDlFQbaiIkQlW92LYTZGk0IiQ8U

https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/coronavirus/coronavirus-and-your-wellbeing/#collapsedcafe

https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/mental-health-considerations.pdf?sfvrsn=6d3578af_8

Maintaining a Routine While In Isolation

You’re stuck at home, all your usual hangouts are closed, you can’t do the day to day activities you would usually be doing. It’s all too easy to say “fuck it” and stay in bed, sloth around the house eating random combinations of whatever is in the cupboard and watching crappy TV.

Having a day or two every now and again to wallow in our own filth and enjoy the pleasures of numbing our minds and bodies, is perfectly acceptable. In fact, I recommend it. This is not however a healthy way to spend the majority of your time, particularly in isolation.

Days will drag and moods will drop (and drop and drop) until you find yourself in a downward spiral that is hard to get out of. If you’re currently struggling with this, it’s okay, you’re not alone.

Here are my tips for creating a routine while in Isolation.

Early Morning
Each morning I get up at around 7.30am, feed all my animals (question why I have so many animals), make myself a hot drink and, weather depending, sit in the garden for around half an hour. I use this time to catch up on personal social media and messages, to reflect on the day ahead and to be grateful for all that I have.

Morning
As someone who regularly works from home, I am a huge advocate of dressing for work. The does not mean a suit and full make up, it does mean taking a shower, brushing my hair and putting on something that isn’t pyjamas.

By 8.30am I try to be sat behind my desk and to start setting out what I hope to achieve that day.
Most of us are privileged to be able to do some work from home. Be it editing movies you haven’t released yet, doing admin and upkeep on your clips store or cam profile. Work on your premium site profiles or interact with fans. Use this time to do all the niggling jobs you haven’t yet found the time to do.
If you can’t work from home, get creative, look at picking up an old hobby or discovering a new one.

Each day at 10am I take an hours break from work to exercise with a friend online. We do this by picking a video on YouTube and starting it at the same time.
For me, training is one of those things I will continue to put off, unless there’s someone to hold me accountable. Training with a friend, not only makes it more fun, but creates an environment where you can both encourage each other to keep active.

Afternoon
At around 1pm I take a break from the computer to create a healthy lunch and spend an hour trying not to think about work. Then back to the grindstone until between 5 and 6pm.
I have had to be very strict with myself regarding the hours I work. When you work from home it is all too easy to continue working long into the night and forgetting the importance of “switching off”. As the saying goes; “You can’t drink from an empty cup”.

Evening
Once work is done for the day, I make time to call and check in on friends, either via text or online video platform. It’s actually been amazing to connect with people so regularly. This is something that ordinarily I don’t have time to do as I am usually rushing around to complete some errand. I feel that during this time of isolation, I have made deeper connections with my friends. Paying closer attention to each other’s emotions and learning so much more about one another.

Sometimes I take this time to learn a little Spanish (been living in Spain 5 years and can only just about order a glass of wine).

Dinner usually takes about an hour to prepare. At least once a week I like trying new recipes found online and “making do” with alternate ingredients from the backs of my cupboards, there have been mixed results. Of course, I’m not Mary Poppin’s, some evenings are spent eating left over’s or getting a food delivery.

Late Evening
By the time dinner is finished it is usually around 8pm and time to sit with the fur babies and watch a series or movie on Netflix.

At around 10.30-11pm I ensure that the house is tidy and dishes are washed, etc. This way before heading to bed I know that tomorrow will start with a clean fresh slate.

 

Everyone’s routine is different, the important thing is to have a routine. If there are days that you really don’t feel like getting out of bed or doing some of the things on your list, that’s okay. Let yourself have those days and enjoy them.

Try writing down a daily schedule for yourself, break the day up into segments and make it as detailed as possible. Do your best to stick to your schedule for a week and see how you feel at the end of it.

I do hope that this will have inspired you to KEEP GOING. These strange times will all be over soon and life will return to normal. STAY STRONG.

If you feel you need emotional support or counselling to help you through these unprecedented times. Please, reach out. PineappleSupport.org