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Pineapple Support Launches Trauma, PTSD Support Group

Pineapple Support has announced a free, online support group with a focus on trauma and PTSD.

The six-week support group, “Steps on a Healing Path: Support for Trauma and PTSD,” will be provided by therapist Russell Stagg and will start May 12 at 5 p.m. (PDT).

“By joining this group, you’re taking an important step along the path to healing,” said Stagg. “I’ll avoid trendy techniques in offering support and guidance, and focus instead on what experts strongly recommend. I’ve helped hundreds of trauma and PTSD sufferers with an approach that integrates ‘gold standard’ cognitive-behavioral techniques.”

Pineapple Support founder Leya Tanit explained that Stagg is “a fantastic therapist and has been helping people with life problems since 2006.”

“His research on trauma has been published in major psychology journals, including a recent publication on trauma in the prestigious Self & Society,” she added. “We’re grateful to have such an esteemed therapist leading this support group.”

The “Steps on a Healing Path: Support for Trauma and PTSD” support group begins on Wednesday, May 12 and will take place online each Wednesday at the same time until June 16.

For more information, and to register, visit PineappleSupport.org and follow the group on Twitter.

Pineapple Support’s Free Addiction Recovery Group Launches Tomorrow

Pineapple Support has announced a free, online support group for those struggling with substance use. The six-week support group, “Addiction: a Journey to Recovery,” will be led by therapist Rachael Farina and will start tomorrow at 10 a.m. (PST).

“This group will be focused on identifying triggers and coping mechanisms to help members maintain long-term sobriety and prevent relapse,” said Farina. “The journey to recovery can be challenging, so the aim of this group is to provide a safe space for those that need support while they learn the tools to cope with overcoming addiction.”

“I’m really happy to be able to make this support group available for all those that are struggling with addiction,” added Pineapple Support founder Leya Tanit. “Rachael is a talented and licensed therapist specializing in sex therapy and addiction. She works from a non-judgmental, humorous, empathetic and authentic approach to help people reach their goals as the focus of their treatment.”

The “Addiction: a Journey to Recovery” support group begins tomorrow at 10 a.m. (PST), and will take place online each Thursday at the same time until April 15.

For more information and to secure a place, visit PineappleSupport.org.

Pineapple Support to Host Online Course on Managing Stress

Pineapple Support will host a free eight-week course, moderated by therapist Sophie Graham, designed to help performers mitigate stress by managing their emotions.

The online course will begin Monday, January 11 and run for two hours, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. (PST), each week at the same time until March 1. Graham will focus on DBT (Dialectical Behavior Therapy) techniques.

“Out-of-control emotions can make it hard to maintain friendships, romantic relationships and can even jeopardise our careers,” Graham said. “Without the skills we need to cope with difficult emotions, it’s impossible to deal effectively with stressful or distressing situations that inevitably come up in our lives. This course will teach how to recognise, understand and regulate emotions to have more choices when it comes to managing day-to-day stressors and distressing events.”

Pineapple Support Founder Leya Tanit described Graham as “a disabled, queer coach and therapist working primarily with marginalised individuals and groups.”

Graham is “experienced in helping others feel more able to manage the challenges in their lives in their own way,” said Tanit. “This course is going to be incredibly useful for anyone in the industry that is interested in managing stress in a healthier and more effective way.”

Pineapple Support is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization in the United States and a registered charity in the U.K.

Visit PineappleSupport.org to register for the course and follow the org on Twitter for the latest updates.

The Benefits of Group Therapy

Have you ever wondered what group therapy is, or what the point of group treatment would be for you? Depending on the issue, joining a group can be a helpful choice for making positive life changes.
Group therapy is a form of therapy where a small, selected group of people meet with a therapist, usually weekly. The purpose of group therapy is to help each person with emotional growth and problem solving. Sometimes a person can do both individual and group therapy, while others may only do a group.
According to Dr. Irvin Yalom in his book The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy identified 11 curative factors that are the “primary agents of change” in group therapy:

1. Installation of Hope: People come to a group to improve their lives. Each person in the group is at a different place in their emotional growth and can offer hope and inspiration to others by showing what they have learned and overcome.

2. Universality: Many who begin group therapy may feel isolated and alone. Being part of a group can help people feel understood and have a sense of belonging. Especially if you are apart of a small niche population such as sex work.

3. Information Giving: A big part of many therapy groups is increasing knowledge of a common problem. This helps members help themselves and others with the same or similar problems.

4. Altruism: The ability to help others in the group is a source of self esteem and increases self worth, especially in those that do not think they have anything to offer others.

5. Corrective recapitulation of the primary family: Some people in group therapy may have stress or conflict in their family. The group can become a form of a family that can offer support and acceptance.

6. Improved Social Skills: Social learning, or the development of social skills, is something that occurs in therapy groups. Members offer feedback to each other about their behavior in ways that can improve relationships both in and outside of group.

7. Imitative Behavior: The therapist models appropriate prosocial behaviors such as active listening, non-judgemental feedback, and support. Over the course of the group the members can pick up on these behaviors and integrate them into their own behaviors. This can lead to improved social skills and self esteem.

8. Interpersonal Learning: Being a group can be an opportunity for members to work on their ability to relate to others and improve relationships.

9. Group cohesiveness: Wanting to belong to a group a main motivation for human behavior. Group therapy can help people feel accepted and valued. This is an important healing factor if members have felt isolated.

10. Catharsis: The release of conscious or unconscious feelings gives members a great sense of relief. Yalom states that it is a type of emotional learning, as opposed to intellectual understanding, that can lead to immediate and long lasting change.

11. Existential Factors: Groups can explore and process issues such as death, isolation, and meaninglessness and help them accept difficult realities.

Joining a group of strangers can seem intimidating at first, however, joining a group can provide benefits that individual therapy alone may not, such as providing a support network. Other group members can help formulate solutions and hold each member accountable for change. Also talking with and listening to others can help put problems in perspective. Others may share similar struggles and give each member the experience that they are not alone. Diverse feedback is another benefit of participating in a group. Each members’ personality and background can help examine problems in different ways. Members can learn many different strategies for tackling issues.

By Nicki Line LMHC, LAPC, CST

The list of Pineapple Support support groups can be found by clicking here